“Allan and I have done a couple of rallies before; he’s a really good guy and very experienced,” says Jardine. “My big thing was I didn’t want to be another Escort runner. I love Escorts, don’t get me wrong, but I wanted something different, and the Avenger is tried and tested.” 

Going green in the forests

Beyond pitching for a decent result on their first historic rally together, Jardine and Harryman have a higher motive behind their campaign this week. They promise to be the only carbon-neutral crew on the rally by using a new online scheme called Net-Hero. 

This has been developed by Jardine’s day-job employer, Hero-Era, the organisation behind old-car marathons such as the Peking to Paris. In a nutshell, it’s a web-based system that enables owners of cars of any age to offset their emissions for any journey for as little as two pence per mile.

“We need to blaze a trail with the rally folk,” says Jardine, “offsetting everything from the rally car to the service van, chase vehicles and even Allan’s flight in for the event. I can’t think of a better place to do that than the forests of England, Scotland and Wales. We want to protect all this, and motorsport has got to do its bit, put its own house in order and put back what we’re taking out.”

It’s a good point. No code of motorsport is more vulnerable to scrutiny on sustainability than rallying, given the nature of racing ICE cars through beautiful countryside. If those who enjoy and make their living from classic cars and motorsport want to keep what we have now, sustainability and a proactive approach are essential. 

F1 sprint is here to stay

The third experimental Formula 1 sprint race at the São Paulo Grand Prix proved a hit, largely thanks to Lewis Hamilton’s magnificent drive to fifth from the back of the grid in just 24 laps. It was the best Saturday-afternoon race yet, in the wake of the first two held at Silverstone and Monza, and was certainly helped by the Interlagos track itself, which always inspires great motor racing.